THE SECOND ASSISTANT
by Clare Naylor, Mimi Hare

April 2005
ISBN: 0-452-28610-7
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Trade Paperback
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Elizabeth Miller thought she had seen it all as an intern for a United States Congressman, but nothing has prepared her for the backstabbing, scheming world of Hollywood. When she accepts a position as second assistant to Scott Wagner, one of the hottest entertainment agents in the business, Elizabeth discovers that she’s not nearly as sophisticated as she once believed. Debates in Washington were nothing compared to having a boss who will snort up anything crushable, coworkers who do not know the meaning of teamwork, an unwelcome admirer with a strange karaoke fetish, and the golden rules of Hollywood which dictate those who may be friends and those who may be lovers.


Still, Elizabeth is not a quitter, and in a town where you are hot on Monday and freezing on Tuesday, she is determined to become more than a second assistant even if it means paying for her own therapist.


Welcome to the inner circle of Hollywood. It is a magical kingdom where few visit, even fewer live, but where the majority longs to go. With their awe-inspiring novel, The Second Assistant, authors Clare Naylor and Mimi Hare allow readers to live out their fantasies as part of that golden world.


Well sort of at least…even a dreamer may have to begin as a member of the working class, and so the reader views Hollywood through the eyes and ears of Elizabeth Miller, one of the most remarkable characters in contemporary fiction. Elizabeth is an admirable female lead because even when the hot coals are under her feet, she still refuses to give in to the heat and step away from the flames of the fire. Each morning she wakes up and goes back into the rat race is another page of an exciting story for the reader.


Be warned The Second Assistant will cause rolling on the floor laughter and double digits of “could it really be like that?” Readers will love this exceptional literary journey. Hollywood could only be this good in print.


Reviewed in May 2005 by Natasha.