THE TROUBLE WITH VALENTINE`S DAY
by Rachel Gibson

February 2005
ISBN: 0-06-000926-8
Reviewer Graphic Button Avon Books
Mass Market Paperback
Rating:



The Trouble With Valentine’s Day isn’t part of a series, but some of the names and places will be familiar if you’ve read two of Gibson's earlier books. Rob Sutter is a former hockey player for the Seattle Chinooks, a team introduced in See Jane Score. And this story takes place in Gospel, Idaho which was the same setting for True Confessions.



Kate Hamilton is down on love and life. After a tragic event, she’s decided to hang up her private investigator license and move back home with her grandfather. His wife died two years earlier, and Kate figures he can use some help with his grocery store, and with his love life.



Rob Sutter’s hockey career and marriage both came to an abrupt end as the result of a one night stand. The woman he slept with wasn’t stable and tried to shoot him to death. While recovering, he moved to Gospel where his mother, a nurse, could help him mend. He liked the area so much that he stayed and opened a sporting goods store. Understandably he’s a little hesitant to trust another woman.



Kate and Rob meet by chance on Valentine’s Day when she’s forced off the road due to weather conditions. The first time they meet is one of my favorite scenes in the book. Let’s just say it didn’t go well, so you can imagine their surprise and chagrin when they realize they are both going to be living in the same small community.



As Rob’s mom and Kate’s grandfather become involved, the two are forced to spend more time together, and realize that maybe they were too quick to judge each other on first impressions.



The Trouble With Valentine’s Day is a refreshing tale of two people trying to re-discover themselves. The novel is a delightful combination of scenes that will make you smile, and others that will have you turning the heat down, even if it is February. While it may not have as much humor as Gibson's previous books, you won’t be disappointed.


Reviewed in November 2004 by Jackie.

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