A BEWITCHING SEASON
by Lynn Collum, Debbie Raleigh, Jeanne Savery

September 2003
ISBN: 0-8217-7487-5
Reviewer Graphic Button Zebra Books
Mass Market Paperback
Rating:



What could be more intriguing than the concept of mixing witchcraft and love together? Set in the Regency era during the London Season, these three stories are delightfully fast paced and filled with both ingredients.


The Bewitched Baron by Lynn Collum is the first story. Naomi Clayton is reunited with her childhood friend Marion when Marion’s brother hires her as companion to his sister. Baron Newlyn is surprised to discover that Naomi isn’t the same young girl he remembers, and now that she’s part of his household strange things are starting to happen. Little does he know that witchcraft --- match making style --- is at work, and he’s about to willingly succumb to the ‘magic’ of love. This is a cute story, with some fun humorous moments.


The Bewitchment of Lord Dalford by Debbie Raleigh brings us the most delightful of the three stories. Annie Winsome is a witch fascinated with the mortal world. The London Season has arrived and Annie finds herself wanting to help her ‘bumbling friend’ Lord Dalford shine, but she’s forbidden to use her magic. Thinking to use an innocent potion’, she’s surprised to discover that Dalford is one sexy, intriguing rogue after all. And Dalford has a secret, too: one that will delight readers with the happy-ever-after ending.


The Reluctant Witch by Jeanne Savery, last but not least of the anthology, introduces us to ‘born seventh daughter of a seventh daughter’ witch Samantha Forsythe. Samantha wants more out of life than being ‘just a witch’. She wants to enjoy her first London Season, and be a normal girl. But friend Mary insists she brew a love potion for her, in order to entice the sexy Lord Dalreach. Unfortunately now, the love potion has decided to work --- to Samantha’s dismay by making her sexy neighbor, Dalreach, pursue her instead of Mary! A delightful read.


For readers looking for an enchanting read, this book is definitely recommended.


Reviewed in April 2004 by Kari.